Artifact #3: Citing Sources

Citing sources is incredibly important, as demonstrated in many artifacts in this portfolio

Portion of sources listed in Literature #3.

Intellectual property is incredibly important, especially in education when students are so frequently searching for answers online. Acknowledging where credit is due is important because it’s unfair to the creator of a work to not get credit. In each of my articles in the “Literature” portion of this website I’ve had to research a large amount of information and site them in the papers. Many other projects discussed in this website have also referred to outside sources of information and because intellectual property is so important, I felt it was my duty to ensure that credit was given where credit was due.

The following projects listed in this portfolio all contain material (either written information, screenshots, or images created by others) which I needed to credit the author/artist because I used or referenced their work in them. Not all documents are cited in an academic standard format (such as APA or MLA citations), but credit is provided in various methods and usually by referencing the website the information was retrieved from.

  • Literature #1
  • Literature #2
  • Literature #3
  • Portable & Educational Open Source Software – The entire document was created by me, however the software I referred to mostly came from PortableApps.com and references to them (or other locations where the software can be obtained) are scattered all over the document.
  • That Our Children May Know Website – Throughout this website are outside references to websites, images, and content, all of which (hopefully) have been given credit for their work. The “Getting Started -> What is a Blog?” page is a great example.

 

Due to not always fully understanding the importance or proper methods for citing sources in educational settings, there are several instances throughout my portfolio where I did not properly give credit where credit was due, not out of an attempt to claim credit for the work, but purely due to a lack of understanding. In time, I hope to identify these and properly add citations to them, but in the mean time they offer opportunities for students to identify locations (especially with images and videos) where I should have cited sources and how I can properly go about doing so. In some cases, though I do not properly give credit to the owner of the work, I do provide links through the image or video which allow the user to access the original work and see who the author is. This is not justification for not citing sources, however it does provide a learning opportunity for students to see how they can find original works and how they can properly update a page to add the correct citation. Here are a few artifacts that could use an update to add where images and videos came from.

  • Intro to Programming Course – Scattered throughout this LMS are images and videos that are not properly cited. There are many other cases in this LMS, as well, where I do provide some form of acknowledgement, but more can be done to give credit to authors/artists.
  • TechTuts – In the Inkscape Case Study portion of this website I provide a YouTube video for students to watch. No credit is provided on this page about who the creator of the work is. Because it’s a YouTube video, this can easily be identified and updated.

Standard 4 Artifacts

Artifact #1: Password Management – Knowledge is Power

Artifact #1: Password Management – Knowledge is Power

Artifact #2: Ethics in Computers – Lesson

Artifact #2: Ethics in Computers – Lesson

Artifact #3: Citing Sources

Artifact #3: Citing Sources

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